Posts Tagged ‘Alan Dronsfield’

How is the bromination of alkenes best represented?

Sunday, October 14th, 2012

I occasionally delve into the past I try to understand how we got to our present understanding of chemistry. Thus curly arrow mechanistic notation can be traced back to around 1924, with style that bifurcated into two common types used nowadays (on which I have commented and about which further historical light at the end of this post). Here I try to combine these themes with some analysis of wavefunctions for a particularly troublesome reaction to represent, the dibromination of an alkene, which I represented in the previous post as shown below.

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The first ever curly arrows.

Friday, July 20th, 2012

I was first taught curly arrow pushing in 1968, and have myself taught it to many a generation of student since. But the other day, I learnt something new. Nick Greeves was kind enough to send me this link to the origin of curly arrow pushing in organic chemistry, where the following diagram is shown and Alan Dronsfield sent me two articles he co-wrote on the topic (T. M. Brown, A. T. Dronsfield and P. J. T Morris, Education in Chemistry, 2001, 38, 102-104, 107 and 2003, 40, 129-134); thanks to both of them.

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