Posts Tagged ‘ACS’

How-open-is-it?

Thursday, February 12th, 2015
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The title of this post refers to the site http://howopenisit.org/  which is in effect a license scraper for journal articles. In the past 2-3 years in the UK, we have been able to make use of grants to our university to pay publishers to convert our publications into Open Access (also called GOLD). I thought I might check out a few of my recent publications to see what http://howopenisit.org/ makes of them.

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Blasts from the past. A personal Web presence: 1993-1996.

Saturday, November 1st, 2014
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Egon Willighagen recently gave a presentation at the RSC entitled “The Web – what is the issue” where he laments how little uptake of web technologies as a “channel for communication of scientific knowledge and data” there is in chemistry after twenty years or more. It caused me to ponder what we were doing with the web twenty years ago. Our HTTP server started in August 1993, and to my knowledge very little content there has been deleted (it’s mostly now just hidden). So here are some ancient pages which whilst certainly not examples of how it should be done nowadays, give an interesting historical perspective. In truth, there is not much stuff that is older out there!

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A connected world (journals and blogs): The benzene dication.

Thursday, April 10th, 2014
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Science is rarely about a totally new observation or rationalisation, it is much more about making connections between known facts, and perhaps using these connections to extrapolate to new areas (building on the shoulders of giants, etc). So here I chart one example of such connectivity over a period of six years.

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Five things you did not know about (fork) handles.

Tuesday, March 18th, 2014
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OK, you have to be British to understand the pun in the title, a famous comedy skit about four candles. Back to science, and my mention of some crystal data now having a DOI in the previous post. I thought it might be fun to replicate the contents of one of my ACS slides here.

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The Amsterdam Manifesto and crystal structures.

Tuesday, March 18th, 2014
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I have mentioned the Amsterdam manifesto before on these pages. It is worth repeating the eight simple principles:

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Chemicalizing a blog.

Wednesday, March 30th, 2011
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I am at the ACS meeting, attending a session on chemistry and the Internet. This post was inspired by Chemicalize, a service offered by ChemAxon, which scans a post like this one, and identifies molecules named. I had previously used generic post taggers, which frankly did not work well in identifying chemical content. So this is by way of an experiment. I list below some of the substances about which I have blogged, to see how the chemicalizer works. (more…)

Capturing penta-coordinate carbon! (Part 1).

Tuesday, September 22nd, 2009
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The bimolecular nucleophilic substitution reaction at saturated carbon is an icon of organic chemistry, and is better known by its mechanistic label, SN2. It is normally a slow reaction, with half lives often measured in hours. This implies a significant barrier to reaction (~15-20 kcal/mol) for the transition state, shown below (X is normally both a good nucleophile and a good nucleofuge/leaving group, such as halide, cyanide, etc.  Y can have a wide variety of forms).

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A lab in a backpack

Friday, April 3rd, 2009
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We recently developed a new computational chemistry practical laboratory here at Imperial College. I gave a talk about it at the recent ACS meeting in Salt Lake City. If you want to see the details of the lab, do go here. The talk itself contains further links and examples. Perhaps here I can quote only the final remark, namely that computational chemistry can now provide chemical accuracy for many problems, including spectroscopy and mechanism, and that the basic tools for doing it can easily be carried around in a backpack! Or, perhaps in the not to distant future, an iPhone!