Posts Tagged ‘Academic publishing’

Harnessing FAIR data: A suggested useful persistent identifier (PID) for quantum chemical calculations.

Tuesday, August 7th, 2018
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Harnessing FAIR data is an event being held in London on September 3rd; no doubt all the speakers will espouse its virtues and speculate about how to realize its potential. Admirable aspirations indeed. Capturing hearts and minds also needs lots of real life applications! Whilst assembling a forthcoming post on this blog, I realized I might have one nice application which also pushes the envelope a bit further, in a manner that I describe below.

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First, Open Access, then Open (and FAIR) Data, now Open Citations.

Saturday, February 3rd, 2018
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The topic of open citations was presented at the PIDapalooza conference and represents a third component in the increasing corpus of open scientific information.

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PIDapalooza 2018. A conference like no other!

Tuesday, January 23rd, 2018
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Another occasional conference report (day 1). So why is one about “persistent identifiers” important, and particularly to the chemistry domain?

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Two stories about Open Peer Review (OPR), the next stage in Open Access (OA).

Thursday, October 5th, 2017
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We have heard a lot about OA or Open Access (of journal articles) in the last five years, often in association with the APC (Article Processing Charge) model of funding such OA availability. Rather less discussed is how the model of the peer review of these articles might also evolve into an Open environment. Here I muse about two experiences I had recently.

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Journal innovations – the next step is augmented reality?

Wednesday, August 17th, 2016
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In the previous post, I noted that a chemistry publisher is about to repeat an earlier experiment in serving pre-prints of journal articles. It would be fair to suggest that following the first great period of journal innovation, the boom in rapid publication “camera-ready” articles in the 1960s, the next period of rapid innovation started around 1994 driven by the uptake of the World-Wide-Web. The CLIC project[1] aimed to embed additional data-based components into the online presentation of the journal Chem Communications, taking the form of pop-up interactive 3D molecular models and spectra. The Internet Journal of Chemistry was designed from scratch to take advantage of this new medium.[2] Here I take a look at one recent experiment in innovation which incorporates “augmented reality”.[3]

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References

  1. D. James, B.J. Whitaker, C. Hildyard, H.S. Rzepa, O. Casher, J.M. Goodman, D. Riddick, and P. Murray‐Rust, "The case for content integrity in electronic chemistry journals: The CLIC project", New Review of Information Networking, vol. 1, pp. 61-69, 1995. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13614579509516846
  2. S.M. Bachrach, and S.R. Heller, "TheInternet Journal of Chemistry:A Case Study of an Electronic Chemistry Journal", Serials Review, vol. 26, pp. 3-14, 2000. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00987913.2000.10764578
  3. S. Ley, B. Musio, F. Mariani, E. Śliwiński, M. Kabeshov, and H. Odajima, "Combination of Enabling Technologies to Improve and Describe the Stereoselectivity of Wolff–Staudinger Cascade Reaction", Synthesis, vol. 48, pp. 3515-3526, 2016. http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0035-1562579

Chemistry preprint servers (revisited).

Tuesday, August 16th, 2016
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This week the ACS announced its intention to establish a “ChemRxiv preprint server to promote early research sharing“. This was first tried quite a few years ago, following the example of especially the physicists. As I recollect the experiment lasted about a year, attracted few submissions and even fewer of high quality. Will the concept succeed this time, in particular as promoted by a commercial publisher rather than a community of scientists (as was the original physicists model)?

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Data-free research data management? Not an oxymoron.

Tuesday, May 24th, 2016
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I occasionally post about "RDM" (research data management), an activity that has recently become a formalised essential part of the research processes. I say recently formalised, since researchers have of course kept research notebooks recording their activities and their data since the dawn of science, but not always in an open and transparent manner. The desirability of doing so was revealed by the 2009 "Climategate" events. In the UK, Climategate was apparently the catalyst which persuaded the funding councils (such as the EPSRC, the Royal Society, etc) to formulate policies which required all their funded researchers to adopt the principles of RDM by May 2015 and in their future researches. An early career researcher here, anxious to conform to the funding body instructions, sent me an email a few days ago asking about one aspect of RDM which got me thinking.

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Collaborative FAIR data sharing.

Sunday, April 17th, 2016
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I want to describe a recent attempt by a group of collaborators to share the research data associated with their just published article.[1]

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References

  1. C. Romain, Y. Zhu, P. Dingwall, S. Paul, H.S. Rzepa, A. Buchard, and C.K. Williams, "Chemoselective Polymerizations from Mixtures of Epoxide, Lactone, Anhydride, and Carbon Dioxide", Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol. 138, pp. 4120-4131, 2016. http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jacs.5b13070

Publishing embargoes.

Wednesday, April 13th, 2016
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Publishing embargoes seem a relatively new phenomenon, probably starting in areas of science when the data produced for a scientific article was considered more valuable than the narrative of that article. However, the concept of the embargo seems to be spreading to cover other aspects of publishing, and I came across one recently which appears to take such embargoes into new and uncharted territory.

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