Posts Tagged ‘Peter Murray-Rust’

The 2016 Bradley-Mason prize for open chemistry.

Tuesday, October 4th, 2016
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Peter Murray-Rust and I are delighted to announce that the 2016 award of the Bradley-Mason prize for open chemistry goes to Jan Szopinski (UG) and Clyde Fare (PG).

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Chemistry preprint servers (revisited).

Tuesday, August 16th, 2016
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This week the ACS announced its intention to establish a “ChemRxiv preprint server to promote early research sharing“. This was first tried quite a few years ago, following the example of especially the physicists. As I recollect the experiment lasted about a year, attracted few submissions and even fewer of high quality. Will the concept succeed this time, in particular as promoted by a commercial publisher rather than a community of scientists (as was the original physicists model)?

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The 2015 Bradley-Mason prize for open chemistry.

Friday, June 26th, 2015
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Open principles in the sciences in general and chemistry in particular are increasingly nowadays preached from funding councils down, but it can be more of a challenge to find innovative practitioners. Part of the problem perhaps is that many of the current reward systems for scientists do not always help promote openness. Jean-Claude Bradley was a young scientist who was passionately committed to practising open chemistry, even though when he started he could not have anticipated any honours for doing so. A year ago a one day meeting at Cambridge was held to celebrate his achievements, followed up with a special issue of the Journal of Cheminformatics. Peter Murray-Rust and I both contributed and following the meeting we decided to help promote Open Chemistry via an annual award to be called the Bradley-Mason prize. This would celebrate both “JC” himself and Nick Mason, who also made outstanding contributions to the cause whilst studying at Imperial College. The prize was initially to be given to an undergraduate student at Imperial, but was also extended to postgraduate students who have promoted and showcased open chemistry in their PhD researches.

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Internet Archaeology: Blasts from the past.

Friday, October 11th, 2013
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In 1993-1994, when the Web (synonymous in most minds now with the Internet) was still young, the pace of progress was so rapid that some wag worked out that one “web-year” was like a dog-year, worth about 7 years of normal human time. So in this respect, 1994 is now some 133 web-years ago. Long enough for an archaeological excavation.

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A two-publisher model for the scientific article: narrative+shared data.

Sunday, September 15th, 2013
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I do go on rather a lot about enabling or hyper-activating[1] data. So do others[2]. Why is sharing data important?

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References

  1. O. Casher, G.K. Chandramohan, M.J. Hargreaves, C. Leach, P. Murray-Rust, H.S. Rzepa, R. Sayle, and B.J. Whitaker, "Hyperactive molecules and the World-Wide-Web information system", Journal of the Chemical Society, Perkin Transactions 2, pp. 7, 1995. http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/P29950000007
  2. R. Van Noorden, "Data-sharing: Everything on display", Nature, vol. 500, pp. 243-245, 2013. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nj7461-243a

150,000,000 DFT calculations on 2,300,000 compounds!

Friday, July 5th, 2013
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The title of this post summarises the contents of a new molecular database: www.molecularspace.org[1] and I picked up on it by following the post by Jan Jensen at www.compchemhighlights.org (a wonderful overlay journal that tracks recent interesting articles). The molecularspace project more formally is called “The Harvard Clean Energy Project: Large-scale computational screening and design of organic photovoltaics on the world community grid“. It reminds of a 2005 project by Peter Murray-Rust et al at the same sort of concept[2] (the World-Wide-Molecular-Matrix, or WWMM[3]), although the new scale is certainly impressive. Here I report my initial experiences looking through molecularspace.org

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References

  1. J. Hachmann, R. Olivares-Amaya, S. Atahan-Evrenk, C. Amador-Bedolla, R.S. Sánchez-Carrera, A. Gold-Parker, L. Vogt, A.M. Brockway, and A. Aspuru-Guzik, "The Harvard Clean Energy Project: Large-Scale Computational Screening and Design of Organic Photovoltaics on the World Community Grid", The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, vol. 2, pp. 2241-2251, 2011. http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jz200866s
  2. P. Murray-Rust, H.S. Rzepa, J.J.P. Stewart, and Y. Zhang, "A global resource for computational chemistry", Journal of Molecular Modeling, vol. 11, pp. 532-541, 2005. http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00894-005-0278-1
  3. P. Murray-Rust, S.E. Adams, J. Downing, J.A. Townsend, and Y. Zhang, "The semantic architecture of the World-Wide Molecular Matrix (WWMM)", Journal of Cheminformatics, vol. 3, pp. 42, 2011. http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1758-2946-3-42

Blogbooks, e-books and future proofing chemical diagrams.

Monday, October 31st, 2011
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Most of the chemical structure diagrams in this blog originate from Chemdraw, which seems to have been around since the dawn of personal computers! I have tended to use this program to produce JPG bitmaps for the blog, writing them out in 4x magnification, so that they can be scaled down for display whilst retaining some measure of higher resolution if needed for other purposes. These other purposes might be for e.g. the production of e-books (using Calibre), the interesting Blog(e)book format offered as a service by Feedfabrik, or display on mobile tablets where the touch-zoom metaphor to magnify works particularly well. But bitmap images are not really well future proofed for such new uses. Here I explore one solution to this issue.

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Science publishers (and authors) please take note.

Monday, October 24th, 2011
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I have for perhaps the last 25 years been urging publishers to recognise how science publishing could and should change. My latest thoughts are published in an article entitled “The past, present and future of Scientific discourse” (DOI: 10.1186/1758-2946-3-46). Here I take two articles, one published 58 years ago and one published last year, and attempt to reinvent some aspects. You can see the result for yourself (since this journal is laudably open access, and you will not need a subscription). The article is part of a special issue, arising from a one day symposium held in January 2011 entitled “Visions of a Semantic Molecular Future” in celebration of Peter Murray-Rust’s contributions over that period (go read all 15 articles on that theme in fact!).

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Mechanism of the reduction of a carboxylic acid by borane: revisited and revised.

Sunday, October 16th, 2011
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I asked a while back whether blogs could be considered a serious form of scholarly scientific communication (and so has Peter Murray-Rust more recently). A case for doing so might be my post of about a year ago, addressing why borane reduces a carboxylic acid, but not its ester, where I suggested a possible mechanism. Well, colleagues have raised some interesting questions, both on the blog itself and more silently by email to me. As a result, I have tried to address some of these questions, and accordingly my original scheme needs some revision! This sort of iterative process of getting to the truth with the help of the community (a kind of crowd-sourced chemistry) is where I feel blogs do have a genuine role to play.

The reduction of a carboxylic acid by borane

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Computers 1967-2011: a personal perspective. Part 1. 1967-1985.

Thursday, July 7th, 2011
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Computers and I go back a while (44 years to be precise), and it struck me (with some horror) that I have been around them for ~62% of the modern computing era (Babbage notwithstanding, ~1940 is normally taken as the start of the modern computing era). So indulge me whilst I record this perspective from the viewpoint of the computers I have used over this 62% of the computing era. (more…)