Archive for the ‘Interesting chemistry’ Category

Autoionization of hydrogen fluoride.

Sunday, April 24th, 2016
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The autoionization of water involves two molecules transfering a proton to give hydronium hydroxide, a process for which the free energy of reaction is well known. Here I ask what might happen with the next element along in the periodic table, F.

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Deuteronium deuteroxide. The why of pD 7.435.

Friday, April 22nd, 2016
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Earlier, I constructed a possible model of hydronium hydroxide, or H3O+.OH– One way of assessing the quality of the model is to calculate the free energy difference between it and two normal water molecules and compare the result to the measured difference. Here I apply a further test of the model using isotopes.

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Oxane oxide: a tautomer of hydrogen peroxide.

Friday, April 15th, 2016
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If H3N+-O is viable compared with its tautomer H2N-OH when carrying water bridges, then why not try H2O+-O vs HO-OH?

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Azane oxide, a tautomer of hydroxylamine.

Friday, April 15th, 2016
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In the previous post I described how hydronium hydroxide or H3O+…HO, an intermolecular tautomer of water, has recently been observed captured inside an organic cage[1] and how the free-standing species in water can be captured computationally with the help of solvating water bridges. Here I explore azane oxide or H3N+-O, a tautomer of the better known hydroxylamine (H2N-OH).

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References

  1. M. Stapf, W. Seichter, and M. Mazik, "Unique Hydrogen-Bonded Complex of Hydronium and Hydroxide Ions", Chemistry - A European Journal, vol. 21, pp. 6350-6354, 2015. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/chem.201406383

Hydronium hydroxide: the why of pH 7.

Thursday, April 14th, 2016
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Ammonium hydroxide (NH4+…OH) can be characterised quantum mechanically when stabilised by water bridges connecting the ion-pairs. It is a small step from there to hydronium hydroxide, or H3O+…OH. The measured concentrations [H3O+] ≡ [OH] give rise of course to the well-known pH 7 of pure water, and converting this ionization constant to a free energy indicates that the solvated ion-pair must be some ~19.1 kcal/mol higher in free energy than water itself. So can a quantum calculation reproduce pH7 for water?

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Ways to encourage water to protonate an amine: superbasing.

Friday, April 8th, 2016
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Previously, I looked at models of how ammonia could be protonated by water to form ammonium hydroxide. The energetic outcome of my model matched the known equilbrium in water as favouring the unprotonated form (pKb ~4.75). I add here two amines for which R=Me3Si and R=CN. The idea is that the first will assist nitrogen protonation by stabilising the positive centre and the second will act in the opposite sense; an exploration if you like of how one might go about computationally designing a non-steric superbasic amine that becomes predominantly protonated when exposed to water (pKb <1) and is thus more basic than hydroxide anion in this medium.

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Celebrating Paul Schleyer: searching for hidden treasures in the structures of metallocene complexes.

Saturday, April 2nd, 2016
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A celebration of the life and work of the great chemist Paul von R. Schleyer was held this week in Erlangen, Germany. There were many fantastic talks given by some great chemists describing fascinating chemistry. Here I highlight the presentation given by Andy Streitwieser on the topic of organolithium chemistry, also a great interest of Schleyer's over the years. I single this talk out since I hope it illustrates why people still get together in person to talk about science.

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Discovery based research experiences: gauche effects in group 16 elements.

Wednesday, March 2nd, 2016
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The upcoming ACS national meeting in San Diego has a CHED (chemical education division) session entitled Implementing Discovery-Based Research Experiences in Undergraduate Chemistry Courses. I had previously explored what I called extreme gauche effects in the molecule F-S-S-F. Here I take this a bit further to see what else can be discovered about molecules containing bonds between group 16 elements (QA= O, S, Se, Te). 

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Earth’s missing chemistry.

Wednesday, February 24th, 2016
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At the precise moment I write this, there is information about 108,230,950 organic and inorganic chemical substances from the World's disclosed chemistry. So it was with a sense of curiosity that I came across this article in the American Mineralogist[1] entitled "Earth’s “missing” minerals" (the first in a series of articles apparently planned on the topic of the missing ones). The abstract is particularly interesting and whilst I encourage you to go read the article itself, I will quote some eye-catching observations from just this abstract:

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References

  1. R.M. Hazen, G. Hystad, R.T. Downs, J.J. Golden, A.J. Pires, and E.S. Grew, "Earth’s “missing” minerals", American Mineralogist, vol. 100, pp. 2344-2347, 2015. http://dx.doi.org/10.2138/am-2015-5417

Quintuple bonds: resurfaced.

Sunday, January 31st, 2016
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Six years ago, I posted on the nature of a then recently reported[1] Cr-Cr quintuple bond. The topic resurfaced as part of the discussion on a more recent post on NSF3, and a sub-topic on the nature of the higher order bonding in C2. The comment made a connection between that discussion and the Cr-Cr bond alluded to above. I responded briefly to that comment, but because I want to include 3D rotatable surfaces, I expand the discussion here and not in the comment.

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References

  1. C. Hsu, J.K. Yu, C. Yen, G. Lee, Y. Wang, and Y. Tsai, "Quintuply-Bonded Dichromium(I) Complexes Featuring Metal-Metal Bond Lengths of 1.74 Å", Angewandte Chemie International Edition, vol. 47, pp. 9933-9936, 2008. http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/anie.200803859